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Stamps by MinZki




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November 5, 2012
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That's right. I learned on a blackboard. An actual blackboard at the front of the room with erasers that the teachers would throw at us if we weren't paying attention. And if you ducked fast enough you could get the kid behind you who was NOT in trouble, smacked in the face with a chalk eraser! I remember chalk, big black erasers that would need to be knocked together to knock the dust off of them.

I remember the three-line thing where the teachers would stick three pieces of white chalk in to draw a line across the board and then take the eraser and erase out small sections of the middle line to make their 'dotted lines' for writing courses. I remember classes where the teachers actually had the ability to teach the course, and were not being stifled down with computer courses that teach kids only to memorize and spit back by rote.

I remember overhead projectors coming into play in my later junior high years, but never, and I mean NEVER, did I see a computer inside of a classroom. When I got to high school, the library had a small (6 machines), "computer lab" and at that point we were expected to have our papers typed up. We had the option of typing our assignments up on either the computer or a typewriter at home. It was hard to get time on one of the computers in the library, so most of us did them on typewriters at home!

Anyone else remember this? LOL

I got thinking about this with my child's open-house at the beginning of this school year, and this teacher going on and on about how "great" this "new" teaching program is, and how the children all learn on the computer. And I remember thinking "NOT. IMPRESSED." while he was talking.

And then four weeks later, I am looking back at it knowing I was right, because ALL of the kids in this class are STRUGGLING with it. This instructor is insisting that these children have calculators. Uhm.. hello? My 8th grader needs to be learning her math problems by hand FIRST. A calculator is a TOOL that is brought into play AFTER the children have already learned how to do it! But no. Bring in the computers and calculators, don't teach the children to think.. no, no, must not have that, that would be a threat to the current status quo, if the children thought they were allowed to question things........... or THINK.

Anyway. Turning off the rant lol -- it just got me thinking back to when I was in school. And I am a blackboard baby. We learned on the blackboard, and later on an overhead projector, but never a computer. LOL...
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:icongolddeneyes:
GolddenEyes Featured By Owner Sep 26, 2014  Hobbyist General Artist
As someone who is almost always being taught on computers (and was originally taught with pencils and paper, and absolutely loved it that way), I can look at this and say AMEN. One of my teachers even said there's a Huge push to work with computers because of the new end of year tests, and he say he hates it! that, and there's new heads of the math and LAL (Language arts literacy- Normal language arts is to mainstream) departments-which, I find ironic that they get new heads of BOTH departments the same year their going to start the new testing!

Plus, the honers kids tried it out last year... TONS of problems came up with it! But they still want us to take it.

Not to mention, ALL the teachers have to teach the same thing at the same time! I remember, in third grade, one of the most exiting things to discus with friends in Different classes what we were being taught! Now? Nope. 

Common Core (which, really wasn't brought up here, but, while Im on the subject of things I hate about my school district...) and all of this other stuff, is like having a classroom with a fish, a dog and a monkey, and, to make sure everything is 'fair' you test them on their ability to climb a tree.
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:iconchilde-of-fyre:
Childe-Of-Fyre Featured By Owner Edited Sep 27, 2014  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Common Core is another issue all on it's own. I don't agree with the Common Core, either, and your description of it is absolute spot-on. Most of the changes in the schools in the last decade or so have come down to two things : Money, and Political Agenda. Neither of those two things should have any right to impact the education of children. Unfortunately, both items impact it in many ways, and often times NOT for the better.

The blackboard thing is really frustrating. A dry-erase board is fine, because it functions on the same principles as a blackboard and chalk. The teacher still has to give a verbal lecture, and write/draw things on the board for the students to follow.

My issue with the "smartboards" is that they just don't teach. They often are used in conjunction with little flash animations, the kids are presented with a series of cliffnotes, told to write them down, usually are not given time enough to write down the content from the slides before it moves onto the next thing and just... yeah. They don't learn from it.

Testing on computers is b/s. The MAP testing in my daughter's district was all done on computers, school-wide, and has been for a few years now. It's awful. 

I've actually pulled my daughter out of the public schools this year, and am teaching her at home. She is repeating her 9th grade year because of how poorly the schools are functioning. I am doing material with her right now, that she SHOULD have learned in 7th and 8th grades, for crying out loud. She was never taught these things. She will do much better learning this way. We use a dry-erase board for it, and it works just as well as a black board.

My thing basically comes down to this : Does it teach? If it does, then it doesn't matter what the tech is, it's fine. If it does NOT teach, then again, it doesn't matter what the tech is - get rid of it, and stop using it and go to something that DOES.

Computers have appropriate times, places, and applications during the course of education. Yes. But they are not an end-all, be-all magic answer to cover learning as a whole in every subject.
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:iconjaguar24:
Jaguar24 Featured By Owner May 15, 2014
I LOVE classrooms with blackboards.
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:iconpeachycreek:
PeachyCreek Featured By Owner Jun 22, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
I'm the very same as you. I grew up learning on a black board, as well as a white board with dry-erase markers. That's all we had for quite some time before I started high school; by then the school had already begun installing smart boards at the front of the classroom, or whatever they're called. :lol: Now, schools everywhere are all about computers!

I agree that they're not exactly teaching the youngin's anymore.  They just tell the kids to take down notes (which, within itself, is NOT an effective teaching strategy). You have to really be passionate about teaching to be a teacher nowadays. :no: It seems as if most teachers don't really care anymore. Which is probably one of the major contributing factors to society's current decline.
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:iconchilde-of-fyre:
Childe-Of-Fyre Featured By Owner Jun 26, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
I'm not so sure that the teachers don't care. I don't really think that's the case. They're working for minimum wage. To keep doing a job that barely pays the bills, after going to college to get that job, you have to actually care about what you're doing. I don't think it's really the teachers. Sure, there are some bad eggs in the bunch, but you have bad eggs in every basket, no matter what the occupation is.

I do think the teachers are working with both hands tied behind their back, one leg tied up, and are being told to weave a ball of yarn and run a mile.

Their tools are changing on a constant basis.
Their funding is dropping to record lows.
They are being choke-holded by the school boards and CEO's and pen-pushers who have never stepped one foot in a classroom to teach.
They are being blindfolded by the state administrators and being forced to concentrate on MAP testing and other state testing that is unfair for a number of reasons. This means there is a lot of time spent on test preparation... and much, MUCH less time available to spend on actually TEACHING the subject anymore. They have to force these kids to memorize by rote.
Their jobs may depend on the performance of the kids on the testing.
They are told after the testing to submit a "plan of correction" if their kids did poorly, while at the same time NOT told what AREAS of the testing the children did poorly ON......and still expected to submit a corrective action plan for the next year. WTF!
They are being given crappy tools. Smartboards and Whiteboards DO NOT TEACH. Blackboards do.
Class sizes are ballooning at ridiculous proportions, funding is dropping through the basement, and their own hours are dwindling. Many of these teachers only get part-time hours, and-or have had the number of classes they teach reduced. I have personally seen four teachers this last year, leave the field because of how far the number of classes they teach were reduced (Thus, hours, thus...pay). These were not teachers who WANTED to leave the field. They HAD to, because they could no longer put food on their OWN tables.

I've not by any means covered all of the obstacles I could, but I think I've touched on enough to make the point.

I do agree that there are some teachers who should NOT be teaching, have no interest in actually teaching, and DON'T teach. But I just can't make myself condemn all of them. There are many who do the job, do it well, struggle hard, spend many hours of their own time grading, making lesson plans, going to sleep for a couple of hours and going to the classroom in the morning to do it all over again.

School administrators, state education boards, federal education boards... the government sticking it's nose into things and places where it does NOT belong, reduction in funding of education, reduction in funding, reduction in funding, I could repeat those three words ad infinitum ad nauseam. This is the biggest part of the problem, IMO. They are crippling the schools, the teachers, the children (my city does not even provide BUSING for their kids - ALL children WALK to school here.)

The end result is schools that don't teach...
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:icongeni-chan:
Geni-chan Featured By Owner Jan 4, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
My intermediate school and some of the classrooms in my middle school have chalkboards. But they're just used to write the agenda down on or whatever. My school uses SmartBoards or something like that, I have no idea what they're called. Or we use iPads because of a grant the city gave us last year.
And my math teachers tell us not to have calculators at all unless they say we can. c: They're smart people.
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:iconchilde-of-fyre:
Childe-Of-Fyre Featured By Owner Jan 5, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Sounds to me like the math instructors are, yes. My daughter's school, the math teachers are all insisting on calculators to do the kinds of things I learned by hand in school, and then they wonder why the kids aren't learning their math. LOL
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:icongeni-chan:
Geni-chan Featured By Owner Jan 7, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
My district had a requirement that we learned long division by hand and all kinds of long mathematical equations. We worked on multi-step equations in the 7th grade for weeks until we perfected it; BY HAND. With no calcs.
By what I'm hearing, you should switch your daughter into a different district. I go to a public school, and they're requiring and expecting all these things from us. c: Public education = not as trashy as people think.
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:iconchilde-of-fyre:
Childe-Of-Fyre Featured By Owner Jan 7, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
My daughter IS in the local public school. And the only way for me to switch her to a different district, would be if we sold our house and moved into that district. We cannot just send her to a different district. Not unless we want to pay thousands of dollars each year in tuition that we cannot afford to pay.

I am a product of the public school system myself, and yes, I had to do all of that as well. So it's not the entire public school system, no, but every district in my area is like this. All of the surrounding ones are just as bad as the one she's in now. We would have to move to another part of the state just to get her into a halfway decent school district.

And that is why she just will be getting pulled out at the end of this year. She will be home-schooled from here out, it's that simple.
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:icongeni-chan:
Geni-chan Featured By Owner Jan 8, 2013  Hobbyist Writer
Oh...well, at least it's a sensible choice for your daughter next year. c:
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